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Showing items 1 through 10 of 1045 articles.

  • WVU in the news—Richard Goldberg: A transformative leader in cancer research

    Tuesday, November 13, 2018

    W est Virginia University’s Cancer Institute is well-known for its treatment and innovation. Leading the institute is Dr. Richard Goldberg, who has not only established himself as a transformative leader but also a potent researcher and educator. A native of upstate New York, the renowned gastrointestinal cancer expert came to Morgantown about two years ago. Goldberg previously worked at The Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center, where he served as the Klotz Family Professor of Cancer Research, the physician‐in‐ chief of the James Cancer Hospital, the associate director of the Ohio State Comprehensive Cancer Center and the acting division director of the Division of Medical Oncology. Before that, he also worked at the University of North Carolina and the Mayo Clinic. Goldberg is one of many world-class physicians recruited by WVU Medicine during the past few years, whose research has resulted in more than 300 peer-reviewed publications, including those in the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of the American Medical Association and the Journal of Clinical Oncology

  • WVU Heart and Vascular Institute among top sites in innovative pilot study to improve outcomes of heart attacks

    Monday, November 12, 2018

    The WVU Heart and Vascular Institute was a leading site in a national pilot study assessing a new treatment for patients experiencing a myocardial infarction, or heart attack. The door to unload (DTU) trial was presented yesterday (Oct. 11) as a late breaking clinical trial at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2018.

  • WVU Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute surgeons perform minimally invasive surgery for epilepsy

    Friday, November 9, 2018

    WVU Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute surgeons perform minimally invasive surgery for epilepsy Surgeons at the WVU Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute have performed the state’s first laser interstitial thermal therapy (LiTT) procedure for drug-resistant epilepsy caused by focal seizures.

  • Two new restaurants to open at The Market

    Friday, November 9, 2018

    BurgerShop and Mindful will open Nov. 12 at The Market in the WVU Health Sciences Center.

  • Nancy Sanders Memorial Faculty Research Abroad Grant winners announced

    Thursday, November 8, 2018

    The Global Engagement Office at WVU Health Sciences has announced winners of the annual pilot grant and student travel awards.

  • Global health expert to discuss health challenges

    Thursday, November 8, 2018

    Global health expert to discuss health challenges Keith Martin, M.D., executive director of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health, will dicuss global health challenges at WVU Health Sciences on Thur., Nov. 15 at noon in Fukushima Auditorium. Complimentary box lunches will be provided for the first 50 attendees. 

  • WVU in the news: New techniques employed at WVU Medicine make use of the latest technology to correct the long-time bane of the human foot: bunions.

    Thursday, November 8, 2018

    A bunion, or hallux valgus, is a deformity of the big toe that appears as an enlargement of the bone or tissue around a joint where the toe meets the foot. Bunions are often inherited as a family trait, however, wearing high heels and pointy-toed shoes will make the deformity worse. Because of this, bunions are much more common in women.

  • WVU in the news: West Virginia doctors perform promising new Alzheimer's therapy

    Thursday, November 8, 2018

    WVU in the news: West Virginia doctors perform promising new Alzheimer's therapy Doctors at the West Virginia University Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute in Morgantown have performed a procedure that they say may slow the progression of Alzheimer's, which currently has no effective treatments. "The procedure involves the patient laying down on a MRI table, and then a helmet comes over their head that delivers ultrasound waves into the brain. When you couple these ultrasound waves into the brain with an injection, of what we call micro bubbles, these micro bubbles start oscillating, and they open up the blood-brain barrier," says Dr. Ali Rezai, executive chair of the WVU Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute. The goal of the procedure is to reduce the build-up of germs and toxins inside that blood-brain barrier, and to hopefully allow the clinical symptoms of Alzheimer's to be improved as well.  The first patient to take part in the non-invasive trial is a 61-year-old nurse who has early-stage Alzheimer's. Additional patients are expected to participate in the study soon.  Doctors said the potential benefits of the treatment will take several years to fully evaluate.  Read more: http://bit.ly/2pewuef

  • Pharmacy researcher leads the future of experimental therapeutics at WVU

    Wednesday, November 7, 2018

    Pharmacy researcher leads the future of experimental therapeutics at WVU Researchers across campus are taking a One WVU approach to solving important problems and saving lives. At its core, an experimental therapeutics platform that integrates multiple disciplines from chemistry and biology to the health sciences and cancer institute. 

  • WVU Cancer Institute surgeons perform robotic Whipple

    Monday, November 5, 2018

    WVU Cancer Institute surgeons perform robotic Whipple Surgeons at the WVU Cancer Institute performed the state’s first robotic Whipple procedure on Oct. 17. This procedure is used to treat pancreatic cancer and other tumors and disorders of the pancreas, intestine, and bile duct.