WVU Heart and Vascular Institute first to implement technology for non-invasive detection of heart disease

Thursday, September 26, 2019

The WVU Heart and Vascular Institute is the first academic medical center to install Genetesis CardioFlux FAC magnetocardiography (MCG) cardiac imaging technology. The FDA-cleared system measures and displays the signals produced by the heart’s electrical activity without the use of radiation, medications, or exercise, allowing doctors to quickly and accurately diagnose heart disease.

(Left to right) Peter Farjo, M.D., cardiology fellow at the WVU Heart and Vascular Institute, and Partho Sengupta, M.D., Abnash C. Jain Chair and division chief of Cardiology at the WVU Heart and Vascular Institute, pose with the Genetesis CardioFlux FAC magnetocardiography (MCG) cardiac imaging technology.
(Left to right) Peter Farjo, MD, cardiology fellow at the WVU Heart and Vascular Institute, and Partho Sengupta, MD, Abnash C. Jain Chair and division chief of Cardiology at the WVU Heart and Vascular Institute, pose with the Genetesis CardioFlux FAC magnetocardiography (MCG) cardiac imaging technology.

West Virginia has the highest rate of angina and coronary heart disease in the U.S. This new technology gives the doctors at the WVU Heart and Vascular Institute a new tool to combat the epidemic by helping patients quickly receive the care they need.

This technology will initially be used as part of a clinical trial led by Partho Sengupta, MD, Abnash C. Jain Chair and division chief of Cardiology at the WVU Heart and Vascular Institute. The trial will study patients presenting for cardiac stress testing using traditional methods, such as single photon emission computed tomography, cardiac CT angiography, or cardiac catheterization. These patients will also receive imaging using MCG before their traditional testing.  

“Because of the severity and widespread nature of the heart disease crisis in West Virginia, innovative technology must be used to address it,” Dr. Sengupta said. “Multiple studies using legacy MCG technology have shown that MCG’s accuracy is quite high in identifying patients with coronary artery disease.”

Unlike other cardiac imaging offerings, which require exposure to radiation, the use of pharmaceuticals, and exercise, the MCG scan takes less than 90-seconds and neither uses nor exposes the patient to radiation.

“Chest pain accounts for nearly 8 million emergency room visits in the U.S. every year. About 75 percent of these cases will be non-cardiac origin chest pain. Despite this, determining whether a patient’s chest pain is cardiac is complex and inefficient,” Peeyush Shrivastava, CEO of Genetesis, said. “Genetesis is taking on the global challenge of chest pain management in the emergency room by providing a rapid and noninvasive system to help physicians and hospitals more accurately determine which patients require immediate care and which can safely return home, so emergency staff can focus efforts on the most critical patients.”

For more information on the WVU Heart and Vascular Institute, visit WVUMedicine.org/Heart.

About Genetesis
Genetesis is a medical technology company based in Mason, Ohio, creating and developing integrated biomagnetic imaging solutions to improve patients’ health, outcomes, and quality of life. Genetesis, CardioFlux, and Faraday Analytical Cloud (FAC) are pending trademarks of Genetesis, Inc. For more information, visit www.genetesis.com.